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5 Top Resources for Project Management Offices 
Project Management 3 min read

5 Top Resources for Project Management Offices 

Centralize your operations, align strategy with execution, and deliver projects on time, every time, with Wrike’s five must-read resources for PMOs everywhere.

Webinar Takeaways: A Clear Path Forward for Modern PMOs
Project Management 10 min read

Webinar Takeaways: A Clear Path Forward for Modern PMOs

Here is a full recap of Wrike’s live webinar, “Scalability: A Clear Path Forward for Modern PMOs,” with key takeaways from this three-part series.

9 Podcasts for Project Managers on the Go
Project Management 7 min read

9 Podcasts for Project Managers on the Go

Discover 9 project management podcasts that will help you build skills and learn tips and tricks from project management experts.

21 Unique PMO Use Cases Prove Wrike's Versatility
Project Management 5 min read

21 Unique PMO Use Cases Prove Wrike's Versatility

PMOs have a tough job as they have to play both the roles of quarterback and air traffic controller in determining project priority, when work can begin, where to allocate resources, and reporting on the team and department’s work. They are the go-to person to ensure project charters capture all requirements and impacts to the business before they’re approved to begin work. As work commences, PMOs must monitor and mitigate risks before they knock projects off course. Above all, it’s imperative they know exactly where projects stand and are able to give a comprehensive progress report on all progress at a moment’s notice. Similar to football, where a quarterback is only as good as his receivers, the same analogy applies to PMOs — you’re only as effective as the tools at your disposal. You need to connect strategy, planning, and execution, whether you operate within an Agile or Waterfall methodology. For too long, PMOs have relied on portfolio project management (PPM) tools to get by, but unfortunately, these only offer investment planning and portfolio management, financial planning, cost analysis, and maybe timelines. Traditional PPM setups don’t connect with project execution and collaboration. This is where Wrike shines, offering a combined CWM for PMOs, so they can do it all in one platform and connect strategy to execution to results. This eBook is divided into nine sections, comprising 21 use cases of how PMOs rely on Wrike to connect planning to execution and strategic impact. What’s in the eBook Inside the eBook, you’ll learn: The nine key areas in which PMOs rely on Wrike to get work done The 21 use cases Wrike is uniquely equipped to solve Visual examples of how Wrike enables PMOs to strategize, plan, and execute their work Wrike features that PMOs can use immediately Dynamic request forms: Trigger a pre-planned project from these automated intake forms and route the work request to the appropriate teammate. Customize each form so that you collect all the details upfront and start work immediately. Blueprints: These are especially useful for recurring work as they allow you to quickly create tasks, folders, or projects with attributes you’ve already specified. Create a Blueprint from scratch, save existing work as a Blueprint, or launch new work using a Blueprint you’ve saved. Resource management: With Wrike’s Workload view, project managers get full visibility into each team member’s schedule and workload, can adjust timelines, and reassign work as necessary to accommodate urgent requests or changing priorities. @mention functionality: Just like Slack and social media channels, Wrike’s @mention functionality lets you tag stakeholders as needed to request their feedback or inform them of project updates. Anytime you tag someone, they receive automated notifications in Wrike and email. Shareable dashboards: Get a detailed overview of work progress at an individual, team, and department level instantly. All stakeholders can track work progress in real time, visualize deadlines, and reprioritize as necessary. Critical path: In Gantt charts, focus on tasks that are crucial to completing a project and tasks that can cause work to fall behind. Via the Timeline, all tasks that are part of the critical path turn red, and those that don’t remain their original color. Project scorecard: With budgeting in Wrike, program managers can add custom fields to track budget spend for their entire program while also sharing real-time updates with their team and highlighting key milestones and KPIs. Work breakdown structure: Make large projects more manageable by breaking them down into smaller items, such as folders, subfolders, tasks, and subtasks, while organizing everything into programs that roll up into portfolios. RAID logs and project risk report: Identify and score potential risks based on severity during planning so that they can be mitigated along the way. PMOs can track and resolve these risks using the risk management dashboard. Finally, project managers can monitor risks from start to finish with Wrike’s weekly automated project risk report. Time tracking: Track resource spending against planned budgets in near real-time and lock time entries after approval, whether you prefer weekly, monthly, or a specified interval. If you forget to set a timer, you can even add time retroactively with a few clicks. Cross-tagging: Give full transparency to everyone into work items (those who need it) so they can track projects amongst their workflows. Cross-tag tasks, subtasks, folders, milestones, entire projects, and more. No other CWM can match Wrike’s cross-tagging functionality. Get all the PMO use cases here There are 21 great reasons why PMOs at Siemens, Walmart Canada, and Ogilvy trust Wrike — it’s the most robust CWM solution to help them connect strategy, execution, and results. Get the specifics by downloading the use case eBook here.

33 Selected Blogs About Innovation, Project Management and 2.0: Vote for the Best!
Project Management 7 min read

33 Selected Blogs About Innovation, Project Management and 2.0: Vote for the Best!

What project management blogs do you read? I’ve assembled a list of blogs that give me substantial food for thought when I write on innovations in project management. The list also includes blogs that serve as great sources of information about Enterprise 2.0, new management methodologies, leadership, motivation, as well as useful project management tips you can use in your day-to-day job. I hope these resources will help you take a look at your management practices from another point of view or perhaps even  push you to radical changes in the ways you manage your projects and teams. I wrote a short summary for every blog, so that it would be more convenient for you. Enjoy! I deliberately listed these blogs in alphabetical order, giving no preferences. I did it because I want you to decide which blogs will make it to TOP 10 Blogs for Project Manager 2.0. I’m a believer in collective intelligence, and I think that ratings like this should be made collaboratively. So I want you to let me know which of the blogs on this list you like best and why. Just leave a comment to this post. You don’t see a blog that makes worthwhile Project Management 2.0 reading? Tell me what blogs on project management, Enterprise 2.0, leadership and team-building you read. Go ahead and post the link to your favorite blog related to these topics in the comments. I also ask you not to post links to irrelevant blogs, e.g. blogs marketing a particular project management product or training program. 1.   A Girl’s Guide to Project Management – the name of this blog can be misleading, as it will be interesting even to those who don’t fall into the “4girls” category. Elizabeth Harrin blogs about everything connected with project management: events, books, tools, real-life war stories, you name it. 2.   Agile Software Development Made Easy! – a site where you can find the answers to all your questions about agile management, agile software development, agile planning and agile-related methodologies, such as  Scrum, eXtreme Programming and Lean. 3.   Andrew McAfee’s Blog: the creator of the term Enterprise 2.0 blogs on his recent research in this sphere and analyses how Enterprise 2.0 is changing the way organizations work today. 4.   Bertrand Duperrin's Notepad is a useful source of ideas, analysis and examples for those who are interested in the HR aspect of Enterprise 2.0 and social technologies. 5.   Better Projects: Craig Brown blogs about project management in real life, requirements management, leadership, etc. You’ll find numerous tips that will help you in puzzling moments. 6.   CloudAve – a group of bloggers, lead by Zoli Erdos and Ben Kepes “live and breathe cloud computing.” They cover the latest news in this industry and publish analytical posts about SaaS, enterprise software, project management and related topics. 7.   Collaboration 2.0 – an influential, seasoned Enterprise 2.0 consultant, Oliver Marks, writes about collaboration in the enterprise, its development, its necessity, its road blocks, its examples and tools that can be used to foster collective work in an organization. 8.   Daniel H. Pink (personal blog): Dan is a great thinker who has interesting ideas on motivation and management in the new creative economy. 9.    Dave Garrett’s Project Management 2.0 – a blog where the author covers different real-life project management situations, helping his readers to overcome difficulties they may have in running their projects. 10.   Enterprise Web 2.0: Dion Hinchcliffe, an influential Enterprise 2.0 thinker, analyses the latest trends in this industry and gives his unique point of view on how Web 2.0 social technologies are reshaping the business world. 11.   Eric Brown’s Technology, Strategy, People & Projects – a wonderful collection of the author’s ideas and tips on topics from project management to business models and business strategy. Many of you will probably find Eric’s “New CIO” series very useful. 12.   Gary Hamel’s Management 2.0, written by an outstanding management innovator, is a perfect place to find thoughts on how the development of the technologies transform the traditional management discipline. 13.   Gil Yehuda's Enterprise 2.0 Blog – here you’ll find practical advice on how you can upgrade your organization’s collaboration and management practices with Enterprise 2.0 tools and behaviors. 14.   ITSinsider: Susan Scrupski is a well-known Enterprise 2.0 expert and has a very interesting blog where she publishes her thoughts on the latest trends  in this sphere. 15.   Leading Agile touches important topics connected with agile management in the enterprise: methods, adoption, culture, etc. 16.   Leading Answers – what I like about this blog is that its author, Mike Griffins, an expert in both agile and traditional project management, writes in plain English and gives you practical knowledge on leadership, team-building and other important soft skills that you’ll be able to apply to your projects right away. 17.   /message -- Stowe Boyd, a well-known social tools advocate and visionary, analyses the phenomenon he calls “social Web revolution.” If you’re interested in social tech and how it can be applied to business, this is the place for you to go. 18.   Moving Beyond Management reflects the recent activity of the PMI agile and leadership communities. This blog gives you an idea of what’s hot in agile project management today. 19.   NOOP.NL – a blog dedicated to managing software development; however, you can also find articles on general project management topics like motivation, leadership, discipline, etc. 20.   PMPodcast, authored by a PMP with 18 years of project management experience, this podcast offers some very interesting interviews that give you an understanding of how projects are managed in today’s organizations. 21.   PM Student – if you are a project management newbie, this blog should be your first destination for getting-started tips. 22.   Portals and KM, written by Bill Ives, is a place where you’ll find analyses of the recent Enterprise 2.0 field news, Enterprise 2.0 case studies and thoughts on social media’s practical application to business. 23.   Pretzel Logic covers social software and contains lots of helpful information on developing an Enterprise 2.0 strategy. 24.   Project Shrink – the author of the blog, Bas de Baar, is a “Project Leadership/Social Media guy” and writes about motivation, communication and the transformation of the project manager’s role in the present business environment. 25.   Raven’s Brain – a spot where you’ll find numerous tips on project and program management, personal productivity, professional development and soft skills that you’ll need to build a successful project management career. 26.   Scobleizer  is a hot spot where tech enthusiast and video podcast evangelist Robert Scoble expresses his views on the newest online technologies, gadgets, social media sites, etc., and keeps you up-to-date with the latest trends in this sphere. 27.   Scott Berkun’s blog is a place where you’ll find lots of thought-provoking posts on managing innovation that instantly grab your attention and make easy reading, thanks to the inimitable style of the author. 28.   Scott Gavin, the creator of the famous “meet Charlie” presentation, blogs about how Enterprise 2.0 tools empower innovation and collaboration in the business environment. 29.   Software Project Management is mainly a blog about the software development lifecycle, and the author, Pawel Brodzinski, also writes thoughtful pieces on agility, project management, team-building and other things that will be interesting to a Project Manager 2.0. 30.   TED is not actually a regular blog, but rather a site devoted to “Ideas Worth Spreading,” and it is an unparalleled collection of talks and presentations given by the world’s most innovative minds from different areas. 31.   The FASTForward Blog – an in-depth collective analysis of the current Enterprise 2.0 potential and opportunities, as well as obstacles that sometimes prevent this movement from gaining immediate popularity among business people. 32.   Voices on Project Management – written by a number of highly professional project managers from different regions and industries, this blog is a perfect place to find helpful tips on things like sustainability, talent management, ROI, programs and portfolios, and all points in between. 33.   Zen, Project Management, and Life, written by Bob Tarne, who’s great at introducing new ideas that can be incorporated into your project management practices. Now, go ahead and start voting!

Getting a Master's Degree in Project Management: To Do or Not To Do
Leadership 10 min read

Getting a Master's Degree in Project Management: To Do or Not To Do

If you run a Google search for "Master's Degree in Project Management" you will get over 3 million results for schools across the US and around the world. Granted, those results are not solely listings for schools offering programs, but still — scary. If you try to narrow down your search results by going to a site like gradschools.com and filtering by "Business & MBA" and "Project Management" tags you will still get 327 results. Better, but not exactly a walk in the park. Finding the right program is a big venture. There are two questions you really need to ask yourself before you go hunting: (1) Is a Master's in Project Management (MPM) what you really want? Would you prefer alternatives routes, such as your MBA or PMP certification? (2) And if you do decide on the MPM, what are your personal requirements when choosing a program? Want a better project management tool that your team will actually use? Start your free Wrike trial today! The Great "Project Management Degree" Debate There are conflicting views about whether getting a Master's degree in Project Management is worth the time and money. According to a US News article, 43% of project managers in the US have only a Bachelor's degree. If you follow The Great Project Management Degree Debate, you'll know there are varied opinions on the value of the degree at all. Some people say get the Master's in Project Management, some people say go for a general MBA, some people suggest alternative certificates (e.g. PMP) instead — and then there are others who say don't bother with any of them since experience beats all degrees. Confused yet? We browsed through forums and articles and tried to gather a consensus on whether or not people in the field think you should get your Master's in Project Management: The Pros & Cons of a Master's in Project Management Pros: 1. Employability "Through teaching an MPM program at a local university for the past five years, I wholly believe that the students that have come through this program are much more employable once they have completed the program." — JD McKenna, Project Manager, USA "I have my Masters of Project Management and this qualification stands out in my CV when applying for great jobs. I know lots of guys with MBAs who are still in lower management positions. A Master's in this great field is definitely sought after and sticks out more than an MBA." — Anonymous, USA "My recommendation falls someplace in the middle. I would recommend that you get a Master's in Project Management [focused on] your field of expertise or interest." — Dr. Paul D. Giammalvo, Project Manager, Indonesia   2. More Informed Execution  "I am now in a PM role (with certification) and I definitely think the MPM has helped me understand with more clarity why we do things the way we do and has certainly helped communicate [decisions].... The MPM is really interesting. You get to meet a range of other students with other PM experiences that you learn from and it is challenging and I think personally rewarding." — Anonymous "I hold both an MBA and an MPM degree. I disagree that these two degrees are essentially the same. My bottom line answer is: advanced learning never hurts, so go for the degree. It may not guarantee you your next job. But it should definitely help you when it comes to executing in that job." — Dave Violette, Program Manager, USA "For those going through a Master's program who have already had more than a few years of work experience, PMP certification, and specific large or complex project management experiences, the MS in Project Management will likely have far more meaning to employers and ROI to you - not just financial ROI, but the ability to get the most out of curriculum.... A Master's in Project Management would be an excellent addition to the journey." — Mark Price Perry, VP of Customer Care, USA Cons: 1. Experience and Accomplishments Count More "Good project managers become such by practicing and continuous self improvement. Yes, they need to know the theory, but professionalism comes from applying, adapting and improving it. For that reason I don't think one-off long theoretical study is what would bring you to the next level." — Stan Yanakiev, IT Project Manager, Bulgaria "The qualification has not really helped me at all in getting a job, its only in combination with experience (how do you get that initially) or certification.... As a way to further your career, I am not convinced that the MPM has quite the aaahhh factor that we would like as recognition of our efforts." — Anonymous "I would look dubiously on a PM candidate that has a Master's in PM but no experience. Advanced degrees are more meaningful after you have been in the field." — Mark Price Perry, VP of Customer Care, USA "I would value experience over master's level certification. I would recommend that you look at practitioner-based courses as well. You can take PRINCE2 without any prior experience, and it will be cheaper than a Master's." — Elizabeth Harrin, Director of the OTOBOS Group, U.K. "I liken project management to riding a bike, you can read as many books on the subject as you like, but until you get on and actually ride a bike you know only the theory and not the practice.... As a hirer of project managers I look for experience, then certification, and finally qualifications. Even for trainees I look not necessarily for project management experience but they should at least have participated as team members in a project environment as this environment is completely unlike a normal operational environment." — Julie Goff, Australia 2. MBA is More Widely Recognized "Experience and accomplishments count more than a degree in Project Management. So I would recommend that you complete your MBA first. If Project Management is a module that's good, but for a major, choose something like Finance, Marketing, Supply chain Management, or IT Management." — Satnam Bansal, Business Manager, USA "I found that project management courses in universities are normally aimed at the construction industry. So all the work examples were for building something. An MBA is more widely recognised than a PM masters and assures the business people you can understand where they are coming from." — Julie Goff, Australia (again) 3. More Important is a Positive, Strong Character  "Allow me to add another attribute which, I believe, is more important than experience and certification. The job of a project manager is very dynamic and will require him to handle all sorts of situations; in other words, a project manager is a problem solver by nature. Due to this, a project manager needs to have a positive and strong character to carry the pressure in his job." — Wai Mun Koo, PMO Director, Singapore Other Factors to Consider When Selecting a Program If you went through a long, strenuous, detailed process when applying for your bachelor's program, consider this: graduate school is typically even more competitive. Before you decide which program to select, you need to figure out the potential ROI for completing your Master's degree. Do some long-term planning and roadmap the next five to 10 years of your career. You may be wondering: what can I do with a project management certification? Will a Master's degree help you reach the end of your 10-year plan? What do you hope to gain from the degree? Would you be better off with an MBA or PMP certificate to accomplish your 10-year plan? After collecting advice from forums and articles, here are a few factors you should consider when applying for programs: MPM vs. MBA vs. PMP While we were surfing through the discussion forums based around whether or not to get a Master's in Project Management, we saw a lot of strong business leaders calling for people to get their MBA or PMP certificate instead. Consider all your options; in fact, most people recommended a combination of two or all three. MPM vs. MBA — Both degrees have long-lasting value and show dedication to your craft. MPM is a great choice for people who want to dig into the details and nuances of being a project manager, while MBA is the path you should take if you want to go into higher levels of management that require a wider berth of business knowledge, big-picture mindsets, and the language that comes along with being an Executive. MPM vs. PMP — Both are great for people who want to be better project managers. MPM is a great choice for people who want to stay in project management roles for the next decade. If you don't plan to stay in project management forever, or you want to put off getting a full-blown degree, perhaps PMP certification is enough to give you the knowledge you need for the next 3-5 years of your career. Online or Onsite With the advent of the internet, more and more universities are offering programs online. If you want access to a specific university's resources without the hassle of moving across the country or across the world, consider an online degree. Just remember that you'll lose the great libraries, convenient walk-in access to office hours, and so-bad-it's-good campus food. General or Specialized Some Master's programs give you a general knowledge of project management and all that it entails. Other programs are industry-specific: construction, IT, etc. If you know what field you'll be working in, and you plan to stay in that field long-term, a specialized Master's program might be a better fit. Another tip: some programs offer general MPM programs, but many of their class offerings are industry-focused. Research the course offerings before committing to a program. Theory or Hands-on With the wide assortment of MPM offerings, some universities are theory-based (e.g. write an essay, a term-paper, a detailed thesis), and some are hands-on learning (e.g. create project plans, develop project schedules, learn to track budgets). Don't settle on the first program you find — or the first program that accepts you — make sure they're offering the type of education that suits your goals. Is Higher Education right for you? A Master's in Project Management can be a great asset, or a great waste of time and money. Do your research, read program reviews, and get feedback from your peers before committing to a new degree. At the end of the day, the decision is in your hands, but you don't have to make the decision alone. What made you finally decide to go for your MPM degree or vote against it? Give us your feedback and help out other project managers with your personal recommendations. Sources: http://www.projectmanagement.com/discussion-topic/16656/Should-I-study-a-masters-in-Project-Management http://www.projectmanagement.com/discussion-topic/18467/Need-Advise---Masters-in-Project-management http://www.projectmanagement.com/discussion-topic/6357/Value-of-Master-of-Science-in-Project-Management http://projectmanagement.ittoolbox.com/groups/career/projectmanagement-career/is-swapping-mba-for-ms-project-management-worth-it-5479871 http://www.projectmanagement.com/discussion-topic/19985/Is-the-PMP-a-better-investment-than-the-MBA-

Ideal Project Management Software: Is There One?
Project Management 3 min read

Ideal Project Management Software: Is There One?

I recently wrote an article for PMHut.com. The Project Management Hut is a very useful site for project managers and those who want to know more about this sphere. Articles on topics like traditional and innovative project management methodologies, what is client resource management system, project leadership, the history of project management and much more are written and gathered from all over the world by a group of project managers, who decided to make their vast experience accessible to everyone. The PMHut authors invited me to contribute to their resource and write about a feature set for an ideal project management tool. In my article, I express my point of view on what problems project management software should help you solve and in what way. As always, your feedback on the piece is welcome in the comments to this post.

PMP Certification? Use this List of Helpful PMBOK Guide Resources
Project Management 5 min read

PMP Certification? Use this List of Helpful PMBOK Guide Resources

Want to prepare yourself for a Project Management Professional certification (PMP certification) exam? First things first: PMBOK stands for "Project Management Body Of Knowledge." The definition of what PMBOK means, directly from the 1st (1996) Edition of the PMBOK Guide, is as follows: "all those topics, subject areas and intellectual process which are involved in the application of sound management principles to... projects." The PMBOK is an abstract idea meant to encompass all the knowledge project managers around the world use to successfully manage projects. The Project Management Institute (PMI) has published five editions of A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge, more commonly known as the PMBOK Guide. The most recent version came out in 2013. Some people mistakenly refer to the PMBOK Guide as the embodiment of the general PMBOK. This guide does not contain everything in the PMBOK — you can never hope to capture everything worth knowing in one document — but it's a great place to start. It covers the context in which projects operate along with detailed processes for running projects, and it has been collaboratively compiled by many studied project managers. The PMBOK Guide is a lengthy resource, coming in at just under 600 pages. As such, there are many, many guides to the guide. We went through what Google had to offer and sorted out some good starting places if you're just getting your hands on A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge for the first time. These resources will help you understand PMBOK, the PMBOK Guide, and how it differs from its biggest rival: PRINCE2. 17 PMBOK Learning Resources PMBOK, THE ABSTRACT IDEA What is officially considered a part of the PMBOK? PMI published an overview of the PMBOK standard materials. PMI's Learning Center includes many PMBOK resources. OVERVIEWS OF THE ENTIRE PMBOK GUIDE Here's what's new in the 5th edition, according to PMI: • A 10th Knowledge Area has been added; Project Stakeholder Management expands upon the importance of appropriately engaging project stakeholders in key decisions and activities. • Four new planning processes have been added: Plan Scope Management, Plan Schedule Management, Plan Cost Management and Plan Stakeholder Management. These were created to reinforce the concept that each subsidiary plan is integrated with the overall project management plan. Haven't purchased the PMBOK Guide yet? You can buy it on PMI's website. If you're looking for a general overview of the PMBOK Guide, check out the Wikipedia page:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Guide_to_the_Project_Management_Body_of_Knowledge Don't trust Wikipedia? Here's another overview of the guide (which happens to be very similar to the Wikipedia page):http://www.projectsmart.co.uk/pmbok.php Another overview of the PMBOK Guide with a slightly different breakdown:http://edward-designer.com/web/introduction-to-pmbok-guide-knowledge-areas-processes-process-groups/ PMBOK GUIDE 5TH EDITION VIDEO More of an audio learner? Check out this overview video from IIL describing the differences found in the 5th edition of the PMBOK Guide:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lYaTMBMqWxU 5 PROCESS GROUPS IN THE PMBOK GUIDE Good overview of the 5 Process Groups (skip the top section and go straight to the bottom of this page):http://www.itinfo.am/eng/project-management-body-of-knowledge-pmbok-guide/ Free management eBook covering each of the PMBOK Guide's 5 Process Groups (download link above the social sharing buttons):http://www.free-management-ebooks.com/faqpm/principles-16.htm A presentation on the PMBOK approach based on the 5 Process Groups:http://www.itbusinessedge.com/slideshows/show.aspx?c=78357 10 KNOWLEDGE AREAS IN THE PMBOK GUIDE Browse the content within the 10 Knowledge Areas of the PMBOK Guide:http://standardmethod.net/browse.html#/process Free management eBooks covering each of the PMBOK Guide's 10 Knowledge Areas (click the eBook images at the bottom to go to the downloads page):http://www.free-management-ebooks.com/faqpm/principles-17.htm MORE TOPICS FROM THE PMBOK GUIDE A table showing you how the Process Groups and Knowledge Areas of the PMBOK Guide work together. (Skip the top table and look at the second table.) Process Groups are along the top, Knowledge Areas are down the left:http://www.tensteppm.com/open/A6.1CompareTStoPMBOK.html The PMBOK Guide's take on Work Breakdown Structure:https://www.workbreakdownstructure.com/work-breakdown-structure-according-to-pmbok.php PMBOK GUIDE vs. PRINCE2PRINCE2 is another widely-followed approach to project management, and thus, considered to be the biggest competitor to the PMBOK Guide. A side-by-side comparison of the PMBOK Guide vs. PRINCE2 :http://www.ppi-int.com/prince2/prince2-pmbok-relationship.php A paper comparing the PMBOK Guide and PRINCE2 project management. It comes to the conclusion that the two are not comparable as they serve different purposes:http://www.maxwideman.com/papers/comparing/comparing.pdf Article about how PRINCE2 can be complimentary to the PMBOK Guide:http://www.corpedgroup.com/resources/pm/HowPrince2CanComplement.asp After going through this list of resources, you should feel comfortable with PMBOK and how the PMBOK Guide is organized. If you've done additional research on the topic, please add other articles or books you found helpful to the comments below!

20 Questions for Project Governance Success (Infographic)
Project Management 3 min read

20 Questions for Project Governance Success (Infographic)

Whether you manage projects, programs, portfolios, project management offices (PMOs), or centers of excellence, you want to do all you can to ensure your projects are successful. You need not only good, but great project governance, which encompasses all of the processes, activities, and checks and balances necessary to ensure successful projects, programs, and portfolios.  Check out our webinar From Good Governance to Great: How To Turbo-Charge the Success of Your PMO here Industry-leading global professional organizations, numerous research studies, and the stats of millions of failed projects every year point to an indisputable fact: governance is the #1 critical success factor for projects, programs, and portfolios. Avoiding project failure comes down to establishing effective project governance — but how can your team get there?  How to get to project governance success Great project governance comes from asking the right questions to ensure best practices are followed. By asking these 20 questions, you will ensure you have the right foundational building blocks for project success. Discover why teams across industries and the world choose Wrike as their preferred platform to ensure project success. Sign up for a free trial and get started today. And don't forget to take a look at our dedicated webinar, From Good Governance to Great: How To Turbo-Charge the Success of Your PMO, to discover why governance is critical to project and program success and the questions you should be asking about proper governance.

Get Ahead Quickly: The Fast Forward MBA in Project Management (Book Review)
Project Management 3 min read

Get Ahead Quickly: The Fast Forward MBA in Project Management (Book Review)

Now on its fifth edition, Verzuh’s book provides up-to-date information on change management best practices, real-life examples and case studies, plus details on current trends. It also offers guidance on how to engage stakeholders and apply Agile management techniques to your projects. Those looking to earn project management certification can benefit from this read, as the book gives ample preparation tips for PMI’s Project Management Professional exam.

Free Online Project Management Guide for New Project Managers
Project Management 3 min read

Free Online Project Management Guide for New Project Managers

If you're taking your first steps as a project manager and feel like you're in way over your head with all the terms, acronyms, and best practices, we've put together something that can help. Today we launch our online Project Management Guide for Beginners. It's a complete guide that tackles project management fundamentals and addresses it in easy-to-understand, layman's terms. In the guide, we break down the basics of project management into different sections: a basic glossary of terms; a discussion on project management methodologies; tips on team management, collaboration, risk, stakeholders, and more; even a section on the PMI and PMBOK. The guide also features a sizable collection of frequently asked questions to introduce you to basic project management concepts. We've arranged the guide to allow you to browse by the topic you're interested in, but you can also read through it sequentially for a full overview. So instead of feeling overwhelmed by all the various processes necessary to bring a project to completion, refer to our Project Management Guide for Beginners, and get a clearer picture of best practices and processes for delivering projects on time, within budget, and to exact specifications. Here's a sneak peak at the sections of the Project Management Guide. Go check it out:

Master Wrike Analyze With Our New Certification
News 3 min read

Master Wrike Analyze With Our New Certification

Wrike’s Customer Certification program is scalable training to help users get more familiar with Wrike’s features. Our newest certification, Report Mastery: Silver, is for users looking to master Wrike Analyze’s boards, widgets, and reporting insights.

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