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Infographics

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Do More With Less: How To Consolidate Your Martech Stack
Project Management 7 min read

Do More With Less: How To Consolidate Your Martech Stack

Your martech stack is probably costing you more time and money than it needs to. Recoup those wasted resources with our consolidation tips.

Do More With Less: How To Cope With the Hidden Cost of Layoffs
Productivity 5 min read

Do More With Less: How To Cope With the Hidden Cost of Layoffs

If your company has experienced layoffs, you may be asked to absorb projects and tasks. Here’s how you can create the capacity to take on more.

Boss vs. Leader: What Is the Difference?
Leadership 7 min read

Boss vs. Leader: What Is the Difference?

There is a big difference between boss vs leader. Good leaders not only motivate and inspire their teams to perform their best, but they are also part of the team themselves. They find a healthy balance between managing, leading, and jumping in to help when needed. They are also constantly researching new methods and ways to be a better leader.  People seek out good leaders to work for and turn to them for advice and encouragement. In this article, we’ll help you identify the subtle ways to align your behavior with that of a true leader. Keep reading to learn more about the differences between the two and which responsibilities every great manager and business owner should have on their list if they want to skyrocket to company-wide success.  What is the difference between boss and leader? A boss manages their employees, while a leader motivates and helps them reach their goals. How do you differentiate the two? It’s all about mindset and action. Here are some of the biggest boss vs leader differences: A leader has an open mind; a boss already knows it all  Leaders will adopt a growth mindset. That means they are open to learning new ideas, hearing interesting takes from others, and are willing to try new things as they come up. This helps foster a more creative work environment for everyone. It also helps the entire team feel supported in the work they do, which leads to more productivity and better results. A leader collaborates; a boss dictates  Leaders like to work with other people to get the best positive results they can as a group. They don't simply rely on one or two managers to oversee progress. Although a good manager is a serious asset, leaders are hands-on, brainstorming side by side with partners and employees on the team to come up with innovative solutions. A leader empowers; a boss keeps a watchful eye  Leaders also set up systems and processes that make it easy for employees to make decisions on their own with minimal supervision. This can relate to finances, task management, and even customer relations. With proper communication, leaders make it easy for their team to have a certain level of autonomy no matter what they're working on. A leader takes the blame; a boss puts the blame on others When a team fails, a leader believes that it's their responsibility to figure out what they did wrong before moving on to evaluating other people. They know that if a project didn’t meet expectations, it may relate to the workplace culture, the systems they put in place already, or an oversight of theirs that can and should be corrected for the next project. Understanding the functions of management certainly helps too.  A leader sets an example; a boss makes an example out of people Leaders make sure that the rules apply to them too. They follow them, work them out, and make revisions as needed. They model the behavior they wish to see in the workplace. This often involves thinking positively, showing up early, and showing up often. Are you a boss or a leader: which one works for you? Today's competitive marketplace demands that you produce extraordinary results. How you choose to do that is up to you. But you may already have a leadership style in place that isn’t the best for you or your team. Even if it has worked up until this point, it’s important to seriously consider where you are now and where you’d like to be.  Ask yourself these questions to discover whether you are a boss vs a leader: Do I do my best to make sure everyone’s voice is heard? Do I prioritize self-improvement and continuous growth in my field through books or higher education?  Do I help employees learn from their mistakes? Do I actively look for untapped talent within my team?  Do I help others fulfill their potential?  Do I listen more than I talk?  Do I hold myself to the same standards I’ve set for my team?  If you’ve answered ‘Yes’ to some or all of these questions, then you are indeed a leader. If not, examine the areas in which you answered ‘No’ and consider what you can improve on.  Boss vs leader: can I be a better boss than a leader? At this point, you may be wondering: are there any circumstances in which it’s better to be a boss than a leader?  In some work environments, especially those that are fast-paced and high-stress, being a boss feels more intuitive. When you're short on time, you have to move quickly and make sure others do the same.  For example, let's say you work for a catering company. You're serving a multi-course dinner to a high-profile client and your servers need to be at the top of their game. Let’s take a look at the actions of boss vs leader in this scenario.  A boss would dictate orders as they come up, berating employees for being too slow, or even simply expecting new hires to know everything even on their first day.  A leader would instead make communication clear and respectful. They would also offer a level of understanding for mistakes. A great leader will even proactively empower collaboration among this subset of the team so that they can troubleshoot together as you manage the rest of the event.  In essence, a boss and a leader do the same things but in different ways with a vastly different skill set.  Difference between boss and leader responsibilities The responsibilities of boss vs leader seem pretty similar at first. But once you compare them side by side, it’s easy to see how very different they are.  Boss responsibilities include:  Creating goals Organizing Making plans Delegating  Developing strategies Leader responsibilities include:  Creating visions Innovating Inspiring action Empowering others Developing culture Both techniques arrive at the same outcome eventually. But the journey getting there might look quite different. While bosses rely on themselves and their own innate ability to think for their team, leaders actually do less while making their employees happier by letting them think for themselves.  Take a look at our leadership infographic Leadership matters today no matter what situation you are in. And it can be the single biggest factor that makes a difference in achieving extraordinary results. More resources to level up your leadership skills Blog: How to Show Leadership in Project Management During Times of Crisis eBook: It’s Not Me, It’s You: Why Managers Need to Break Up With Email and Spreadsheets Blog: How to Develop the Essential Skills to Be a Project Manager Blog: 15 Books Every Manager Should Read Blog: 9 Ways to Develop Your Leadership Skills Blog: Which of These Leadership Styles Is Right for You? (Decision Tree) Blog: Ask the Industry Expert: "What Soft Skills Do I Need as a Project Manager?" Blog: What Makes a Good Manager?

How to Create an Omnichannel Marketing Strategy (Infographic)
Marketing 3 min read

How to Create an Omnichannel Marketing Strategy (Infographic)

Think about how many devices and platforms you use a day. Smartphones, laptops, tablets, social media apps, emails — the list goes on. And on each and every one of these platforms lies an opportunity for a marketing campaign to reach you — to speak to you in your language and find out what makes you tick. An omnichannel marketing strategy is an integrated approach to digital marketing, where customers are served at every stage of their buyer journey, no matter where they spend their time. Chances are, you’ve experienced omnichannel marketing many times when searching for something to buy. If you’ve ever entered a store and gotten a notification from that store’s app while browsing or seen an ad for a product just after visiting its brand website, you’ve caught a glimpse of omnichannel marketing in action. The benefits of a great omnichannel marketing strategy are vast, including: Increased brand retention and loyalty Improved brand recall Increased revenue Better customer targeting While creating an omnichannel marketing strategy that works for your brand may sound complex, these five steps make the entire process easier. Use technology to your advantage and get to know your customers with our step-by-step guide.

How to Write a Startup Business Plan
Leadership 10 min read

How to Write a Startup Business Plan

Discover how to write a startup business plan with examples and tips that will help you create your own startup business plan from scratch.

Top Tips for Motivating Disengaged Employees
Productivity 7 min read

Top Tips for Motivating Disengaged Employees

Grow business results and boost team performance by inspiring disengaged employees to perform better. Learn more with Wrike.

A Fascinating Snapshot of Work-Life Balance Realities [Infographic]
Productivity 3 min read

A Fascinating Snapshot of Work-Life Balance Realities [Infographic]

How often do you stay late in the office in order to get that last task completed? If you work extra hours once in a while, you’re not alone. Moreover, as our recent survey revealed, the majority is with you! Thanks to your valuable input, we gathered feedback on working habits and productivity from nearly 2,000 respondents. One of the most interesting things that we discovered is that as many as 87% of business owners, executives, managers, team members, and freelancers overwork. Here’s a digest of our survey’s other fascinating findings: Overworked, but not overloaded When we asked our respondents how much they overwork, the most popular answer (chosen by almost 40%) turned out to be 5+ hours weekly. However surprising it may sound, working extra hours seems to be generally taken quite lightly, as almost 38% of those who overwork say they are absolutely satisfied with their work-life balance. If we take a look at all the surveyed people, both those who overwork and those who don’t, a minority 11.5% said they frequently feel overloaded. The rest of our respondents seem to have found a work management secret that keeps them protected from the stress of overload. It's worth mentioning that this “happiness rate” seems to correlate with the respondent’s job position. Among team members, it’s more than half who don’t feel stressed with work at all. For business owners, the share is less than a third.  It looks like with great responsibility comes greater stress. When productivity peaks Despite different responsibilities, our respondents across various organizational levels have some common things in their work styles. For example, 64% feel the most productive in the morning hours. Unexpected, but true — even freelancers, who often have a totally flexible schedule, voted the same as the majority. We also compared groups to find out who feels more overloaded (the “early birds” or the “night owls”) and we discovered that the share of stressed workers is much higher among the latter. Almost 27% of night owls admitted to feeling overworked quite often, while just 10% of early birds share this stress. Productivity catalysts vs. Productivity killers Increasing productivity requires some extra motivation. What are those factors that drive us the most at work? According to our survey results, the three leading efficiency motivators are: A sense of responsibility A good mood A possible reward Being on a deadline is often considered to be a stress factor. However, more than 54.6% of our respondents find deadlines inspiring for their productivity. Perhaps because they help to beat procrastination, which, along with unexpected interruptions, was listed as one of the most dangerous productivity killers. A picture is worth a thousand words, especially when it comes to stats. To review all of these survey results and more at a glance, check out our new infographic with the rest of our fascinating findings. And don’t forget to share it with your colleagues! Last, but not least: Thanks to your very active participation, this survey turned out to be a blast! We really appreciate your input and, as we promised, we did a drawing of 10 stylish Coffee Joulies among everyone who took part in the survey. Congrats to the lucky winners: Jerry Schmidt (CivicPlus), Ayana Hastings (EmbanetCompass), Steve Fishman (Volunteers of America Michigan, Inc.), Wally Arms (Crescent Inc.), Pascal Condouret (Royal Canin), Noah Sodano (Propaganda Labs), Colleen Fyfe (PARMA Recordings), Spenser Baldwin (Snap Agency) and two winners who asked us to keep their names private. Wrike’s Santa is already on the way with the prizes!

Doing Nothing to Improve Work Management is Costing You Money (Infographic)
Leadership 3 min read

Doing Nothing to Improve Work Management is Costing You Money (Infographic)

When the going gets tough, the tough gets going. We've all heard this saying before, and this couldn't be more true in the workplace. When working gets hard, we have to work harder to rise to the challenge and excel. If managing projects is becoming more and more difficult for your team, following the same-old processes is not going to help you succeed. In fact, studies show it's going to end up costing you more.  Take a look at this infographic that highlights how companies are suffering from poor work management, and see how you can do better: If you like this infographic, share it with your colleagues, or embed it on your website with this code: Infographic brought to you by Wrike Have you had trouble with any of these common pain points? Let us know how Wrike helped in the comments below.  

Online Marketing 101 (Infographic)
Marketing 3 min read

Online Marketing 101 (Infographic)

“Welcome to the team! Have you met John and Rita in SEM & SEO? You’ll be working closely with them. Oh, and make sure you connect with Nancy, she’s in charge of lead scoring and nurturing. The email and mobile marketing teams are in these rooms. How much experience do you have with marketing automation, again?” Woah. Who knew there were so many pieces to the digital marketing puzzle? If you’re new to the world of online marketing, don’t fret. We’re here to help you fit the pieces together — and figure out exactly where you fit in.  Check out our new infographic cheat sheet on the basics of major online marketing approaches: Like this infographic? Embed it on your site with this code:  Wrike Social Project Management Software Related Reads:6 Digital Marketing Trends to Watch in 20157 Steps to Developing an Agile Marketing Team (FREE eBook)

8 Project Management Infographics You Have to See
Project Management 3 min read

8 Project Management Infographics You Have to See

You just became a project manager, or you've been in the field for a while but you're ready to learn more. These great project management infographics from sources all over the net provide interesting education for PMs and PM-wannabes. Check out all these infographics and learn something new about how to define a project. 1. Bust some project management myths you probably believe Myths about remote collaboration, PM certification, paperwork, meetings, and project failure. This infographic busts 5 common myths with cold, hard facts. See the 5 Project Management Myths Infographic. 2. Learn the basics of being a project manager Ever wonder what steps are involved in each project management decision? This infographic breaks down the four important considerations for project managers: scope, resources, timeline, and budget. See the Project Management Level: Legendary infographic on Pinterest. 3. See how to balance hard and soft skills for better project management Discover both the hard skills and the soft skills you need to be a successful project manager, complete with advice on how to improve in those areas. See the Balance of Hard Skills & Soft Skills infographic on Pinterest. 4. Choose between different project management methodologies Once you're working on projects, you'll need to decide which methodology you want to adopt for your team — and Agile or Waterfall project management are not the only options. This infographic covers 16 popular PM methodologies. See the 16 Popular Project Management Methodologies infographic. 5. Know the common causes of conflict in project management You're going to be a project manager, and you're going to have a team of people that will not always get along. It's important to be aware of the most important causes of conflict so that you know how to battle them when they rear their ugly heads. See the Causes of Conflict in Project Management infographic on Pinterest. 6. Everything you need to know about PMOs Who uses PMOs? What kind of challenges and benefits do PMOs bring to their companies? Learn all this and more in a simple infographic. See the What is a PMO? infographic. 7. A rundown of Gantt charts You keep hearing about Gantt charts, but you aren't really sure what they do or why you would use them. This infographic breaks down the history, anatomy, and benefits of Gantt charts for your project planning. See the What is a Gantt Chart? infographic. 8. Lessons in project failure from the Death Star Projects fail. It happens. The best way to bounce back is to learn from those failures. Learn vital lessons from the management mishaps of the Death Star. See the 10 Reasons Projects Fail: Lessons Learned from the Death Star infographic. Which is your favorite?  Which infographic is your favorite? Or what new infographic would you like to see us create? Let us know in the comments.

10 Ways to Beat Deadline Stress (Infographic)
Productivity 3 min read

10 Ways to Beat Deadline Stress (Infographic)

However much deadline stress affects you, it's good to know that there are ways to deal with it. Below is an infographic listing 10 ways to make deadlines less stressful.

10 Reasons the Death Star Project Failed (Infographic)
Project Management 3 min read

10 Reasons the Death Star Project Failed (Infographic)

A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away… The Death Star projects failed spectacularly. Learn from the Empire’s mistakes and keep your projects from falling to the Dark Side! Check out our new Star Wars-inspired infographic and avoid further destruction by sharing it with all your padawans. You can share this infographic with all your padawans by embedding it on your blog with this code: Wrike Project Management Software> Feel like a Jedi master? Your education doesn't have to stop there. Check out lessons learned from other big project failures or read all the details about the Death Star failures to avoid making the same mistakes!